Pastimes

1957 Pantry – Try Tuna Salad

Hold the presses! On July 11, 1957, the Department of the Interior issued a release to food editors across the nation. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service, whose mission is to “conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people,” want citizens from New York City to Newport Beach to . . . “Try Tuna Salad for Main Dish at Picnics.”

I I1957 Tuna Salad

I’m not sure how suggesting a picnic with tuna salad, using canned tuna, meets the Fish and Wildlife Service mission to conserve and protect our fish and wildlife?

But let’s leave that little puzzle and head to the beach! Pack up the plaid Skotch Kooler, the Pendleton blanket, the sand toys, and the transistor radio. Spread out the potato chips, buttered rolls, fruit, coffee and cupcakes. Build a driftwood fire, see the sun set, burn a few marshmallows, and watch the stars come out. It’s summertime . . . .

Image Credit: U.S. Department of the Interior Information Service

July 11, 1957 – Texas Boy Scouts Arrive for the 1957 National Jamboree

Boy Scout Jamboree NPS

Scouts arriving at the Valley Forge State Park for the Jamboree

On July 11, 1957, the Texas and Pacific Special, with eleven passenger coaches, two baggage cars, and one baggage dormitory car, arrived at Valley Forge State Park with 576 Texan Boy Scouts and their leaders for the 1957 National Scout Jamboree.  The excited group joined Scouts from across the nation – 52,580 in all – along with 30,000 visitors.  Valley Forge was transformed into a 25,000-tent city with a theater carved out of a hillside the size of Yankee Stadium.

On the way, the “TP Special” had stopped in Washington, DC for tours of the White House, the Capitol Building, the Washington and Jefferson memorials, Arlington National Cemetery, and Mount Vernon.  While in Valley Forge, the Scouts heard from Vice President Richard Nixon, watched fireworks displays, learned the history of Valley Forge, and were treated to an aerial show by the US Air Force Thunderbirds.  One day trip took them to New York City to see the Empire State Building, Rockefeller Center, the Statue of Liberty, Radio City Music Hall, and the United Nations.  On another day they traveled to Philadelphia to see Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell, Carpenter Hall (where the first Continental Congress met in 1774), the home of Betsy Ross, and the World War II U-boat-fighting submarine, USS Hake.

On the final night of the Jamboree, the story of Scout founder Braden Powell was told.  The stadium lights were turned off, and over 52,000 candles illuminated the memorable scene.  The Texas Scouts boarded their train for home, first stopping at Niagara Falls, then travelling through Canada to Detroit.  The Ford Motor Company played host to the group, giving them an exciting look at a huge factory assembly line – and a shiny new car produced in just minutes.  For many boys, it was the trip of a lifetime.

Image Credit: National Park Service

July 9, 1957 – The 24th All-Star Game at St. Louis, Missouri

On July 9, 1957, the Major League Baseball All-Star Game was held at Sportman’s Park in St. Louis, Missouri, home of the National League St. Louis Cardinals.  Controversy surrounded the game as Cincinnati Reds’ fans stuffed the ballot box and sent all but one of their starting players to the 24th playing of the midseason exhibition game.  The Cincinnati Enquirer printed up pre-marked ballots for fans to send in; as a result, over half of the final vote tally originated from the Reds’ hometown.

New York Giant Willie Mays and Milwaukie Brave Hank Aaron were appointed by Commissioner Ford Frick to replace two Reds’ players.  Voting procedures changed as well – player selections were made by managers, players, and coaches until 1970, after which time fans were once again allowed to nominate their favorites.

Revenge was sweet as the American League team defeated the National League, 6-5, after an action-packed ninth inning which began with the AL team ahead 3-2.  In the top of the inning, a single,a  fumble, a sacrifice, another single and a double brought the score to 6-2 for the AL.  The NL followed with a walk, a triple, a wild pitch, a single and another walk, a strike out, another single, a runner out at third on a steal, and then a pinch hit caught in left-center. It wasn’t enough to overcome outstanding fielding by the American League stars, who were able to squeak out their second win in eight years.

The starting lineups:

American League
1. Harvey Kuenn, Tigers, SS
2. Nellie Fox, White Sox, 2B
3. Al Kaline, Tigers, RF
4. Mickey Mantle, Yankees, CF
5. Ted Williams, Red Sox, LF
6. Vic Wertz, Indians, 1B
7. Yogi Berra, Yankees, C
8. George Kell, Orioles, 3B
9. Jim Bunning, Tigers, P
Manager: Casey Stengel

National League
1. Johnny Temple, Reds, 2B
2. Hank Aaron, Braves, RF
3. Stan Musial, Cardinals, 1B
4. Willie Mays, Giants, CF
5. Ed Bailey, Reds, C
6. Frank Robinson, Reds, LF
7. Don Hoak, Reds, 3B
8. Roy McMillan, Reds, SS
9. Curt Simmons, Phillies, P
Manager: Walter Alston

Image Credit: Wikimedia Fair Use

July 4, 1957 – An American Family Visits the Pennsylvania Gettysburg Monument

On July 4, 1957, American father Walter Reed took his family to visit Gettysburg, where occurred from July 1-3, 1863 one of the most significant battles of the Civil War.  More soldiers died at Gettysburg than at any other Civil War battle, and the Union victory there signaled a turning point in our nation’s conflict.  Reed’s photo captures the Pennsylvania Monument, the largest of many monuments gracing the site. The granite pavilion commemorates the state which provided the most troops, the Union army commander, and the battlefield itself.

A little over four months later, on November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln dedicated the Soldier’s National Cemetery at Gettysburg with a short speech that has come to stand with the Declaration of Independence as a founding document for our nation.  On July 4th, Walter Reed and his family celebrated our independence at Gettysburg; perhaps they also read the Gettysburg Address together:

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

“Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure.  We are met here on a great battlefield of that war.  We have come to dedicate a portion of it as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live.  It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

“But in a larger sense we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate –  we can not hallow this ground.  The brave men, living and dead, who struggled, here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract.  The world will little note, or long remember, what we say here, but can never forget what they did here.

“It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they have, so far, so nobly carried on.  It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining here before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Reed took a number of photos that day, some of which were later published in The Open Road: The Way We Were, by Dorothy Youngblood. His photo of the Pennsylvania Monument includes his beautiful turquoise and white 1955 Ford Fairlane Town Sedan.

Image Credit: Leon Reed/flickr

Mid-Century Modern Typewriters

In the 1950s, appliances and bathroom fixtures were blooming with color. Now-classic cars sported two-tone paint treatments and lots of chrome.

It turns out that utilitarian typewriters were getting a make-over, too. Pink, blue, green, red – even two-tone with chrome! – added a cheery or racy edge to typists’ lives.

What would it be like to turn out a quarterly report, homework, recipe cards, or a letter to grandma with one of these sleek machines?

Royal Typewriter Company

Smith Corona

Olivetti

Underwood Typewriter Company

The lovely Underwood Golden Touch on the right came to my attention through – and in fact this post was inspired by – a vintage advertisement featured on Janet Webb’s Vintage Gaze blog. I recommend her site for mid-century modern mavens.

And – finally – an amazing machine from Halda:

Halda Green

Halda Forest Green

The complete description of this beauty reads, “This lovely, rare typewriter . . . features a vivid forest green body with a crinkle matte finish, with chrome detailing around the middle of the machine. Love the sharp red stripe right in the center of the chrome!”

Image Credit: Underwood Golden Touch: Robert Messenger/ozTypewriter/blogspot
Image Credit: All other images: Etsy

 

1957 Boomer Baby

Born in 1957 LimaLimaLtdWere you born in 1957?

If so, we are kindred spirits.

How did entering the world in 1957 affect your life? What are you grateful you experienced? What did you miss? What do you wish you’d missed?

Here’s my list:

I’m grateful I experienced –

  • Great TV shows like Leave it to Beaver, Gilligan’s Island, and Perry Mason
  • The freedom to wander on my own around my Portland neighborhood
  • Scholastic book orders in grade school, which delivered a fresh stack of books to read every month
  • The relief when it was clear that my friends would not go to Vietnam
  • Girls sports teams in high school, after Title 9 took effect
  • Star Wars on opening night in my local theater. Remember the knock-you-back-in-your-seat trumpet fanfare during the opening credits? The stomach-dropping sensation of rollercoastering over the dunes of Tatooine?

I missed –

  • The beginning of the Beatles and the hippie Summer of Love thing
  • Laugh-In, which my parents thought was obscene
  • Owning a Chevy Bel Air before they became an expensive classic

I wish I’d missed –

  • The disco generation! I’m still embarrassed . . . really embarrassed

 

How about you? Please leave me a comment and share.

One more question, Class of 1975: was this The Slow Dance at your senior prom, too?

 

Image Credit: LiraLira Ltd.

October 15, 1957 – Bridge and Cinnamon Coffee Bars

Cinnamon Coffee Bars; Betty Crocker Cookbook, 1957. Photo: Annacia at Food.com

On October 15, 1957, housewives across America may have anticipated a fun Tuesday afternoon playing bridge with the girls.  Ladies would have gathered in multiples of four around card tables in the living room for chat, a friendly rubber or two, and light refreshments.  Then, as now, a little something sweet was always welcome with a good cup of hot coffee.  Everyone had their favorite cookie recipes but having company over was often a fun time to try something new.  The 1957 edition of the Betty Crocker Cookbook included a recipe for a double-your-pleasure coffee-accompanying cookie, “Cinnamon Coffee Bars“.  Most bridge guests probably “bid” for this treat, rather than “passed”.

Cinnamon Coffee Bars

1/4 cup shortening, or softened butter
1 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1/2 cup hot coffee
1 1/2 cup flour
1 t baking powder
1/4 t baking soda
1/4 t salt
1/2 t cinnamon
1/2 cup raisins
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
For the Glaze:
1 cup sifted confectioner’s sugar
1/4 t salt
1/2 t vanilla
1 T water

Preheat the oven to 350°F.  Cream together shortening or butter, brown sugar and egg, then stir in coffee.  Stir in flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon.  Blend in raisins and walnuts.  Spread mixture in a greased 9 x 13 inch pan and bake for 18 to 20 minutes.  Mix together ingredients for glaze.  Cut cake into bars and frost with glaze while warm.